Why Leaky Gut is More Serious Than You Know | Boot Camp Challenge

Why Leaky Gut is More Serious Than You Know

Why Sugars are NOT Killing You
October 3, 2017
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October 31, 2017
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Why Leaky Gut is More Serious Than You Know



Remember a few weeks back when I chatted with Sarah (our nutritionist) for two hours? And, that I had to cut our podcast into two because we had too much to say?

Well, here is part two! And, I can't wait for you to listen!

And, if you don't remember, or you didn't have an opportunity to listen yet, here are the deets.

I interviewed Sarah Weitz, MS, RD., Professor at Michigan State and asked her ALL of YOUR questions. Not only did she answer them, she went on to explain the following:

• Sugar alone does NOT make you fat (and you will be surprised what does!)
• How much sugar is recommended to intake per day.
• High cholesterol may be caused by your mom and dad (whaaat?!)
• Leaky gut is usually much more serious than people know.

As you continue to listen, she will also debunk the myths of fruits affecting your PH balance, sugar alone causing diabetes, and how the alkaline diet is a lie.

Now, go grab a coffee or wine, get your laundry going, and push play. Then, you can join me and Sarah for our SECOND nutrition talk on this eleventh episode of our BCC podcast.

As always, I feel blessed you are listening. Thank you for your time. I understand how important it is, and I will always try my best to provide you with the greatest information and content on the planet. And, if you have topics you would like me to cover or questions I can answer, please email me at lori@bootcamp-challenge.com.

And, if you have topics you would like me to cover or questions I can answer, please email me at lori@bootcamp-challenge.com.

And then, once you finish listening, would you take a second to subscribe to our podcast? It takes just a few seconds and will guarantee you don't miss out on upcoming episodes! Click here to subscribe!

Love you much, 
Lors

If you found this to be helpful, we would love it if you would share it with your friends.

Now get out there, and keep going for your goals one step at a time. Invest in yourself!

Hoo-Aah!
The BCC Team

4 Comments

  1. abby puckett says:

    question for Sarah, I saw a nutritionist/chiropractor and she did an extensive blood test for food sensitivities and also tested my yeast level in my blood. I was told I had way too much yeast in my blood/yeast overgrowth ….is there a correlation between these 2 things? leaky gut/yeast overgrowth. I also found out the foods I am extremely sensitive to as well which was very helpful! what is her opinion of Dr Josh Axe?

    BTW…awesome podcast

  2. admin says:

    Thank you for your comment, Abby! We will pass your questions on to Sarah and see what she has to say. Glad you are enjoying the podcast and thanks for listening!

  3. admin says:

    Hi Abby! Here are Sarah’s responses numbered below:

    “Comment:
    question for Sarah, I saw a nutritionist/chiropractor (1) and she did an extensive blood test for food sensitivities and also tested my yeast level in my blood (2). I was told I had way too much yeast in my blood/yeast overgrowth (3) ….is there a correlation between these 2 things? leaky gut/yeast overgrowth. (4) I also found out the foods I am extremely sensitive to as well which was very helpful! (5) what is her opinion of Dr Josh Axe? (6)”

    1) a chiropractor with an actual degree in nutrition (very very rare), or a chiropractor who does nutritional assessments and dietary recommendations but has no “certifiable” training in nutrition (much much much more common)?

    2) I hope the doc was more specific than just “yeast” level in blood. There should not be yeast in blood. Our skin, GI and reproductive tracts are colonized with a specific type of yeast called Candida, which normally doesn’t cause any problems (aside from the occasional yeast infection in women, e.g. yeast overgrowth in the vaginal canal). If Candida gets into your blood stream, that is a septic infection called invasive candidasis or cadidemia, and is VERY dangerous – usually happens during a hospitalization and results in longer, more complicated hospital stays.

    3) Again, specificity is important here. If she truly has a Candida infection in her blood, she needs to see her primary care physician as soon as possible. What is more likely, however, is that the chiropractor ordered a bunch of nonspecific tests on the blood panel, which are often not truly indicative of a problem (more on that below).

    4) Possibly, but as we talked about in the podcast, leaky gut syndrome is very poorly understood, and any correlation at this point is purely hypothesis.

    5 – this is a long one) Back to the blood tests. I ran into this same issue with the other camper who sent me the results of her blood tests (ordered by her chiropractor) that she was told indicated her specific food allergies. The problem with the lab tests that were ordered were IgG tests; IgG testing is looking for the type of delayed-response antibodies (in this case, immunoglobulin G, or IgG) that can lead to inflammatory processes in the body. However, the existence of IgG antibodies toward a particular food does NOT provide absolute certainty of allergy to that food. IgG is a “memory antibody”, which only indicates exposure to a food, not necessarily an allergy. For example, if you drew my blood and tested for IgG antibodies to gluten, that only means that I have recently been exposed to gluten (e.g. I ate bread yesterday), not that I am allergic to it. To be absolutely sure of a food allergy, you would need allergen-specific IgE testing, which provides definitive diagnoses of food allergies. Food sensitivities are even trickier (and also not well substantiated in the medical literature). Placebo effect can also be in play; the doctor says I have a sensitivity to X, and when I make a point to avoid X, I feel better.

    My general concern/wariness is that I see a LOT of chiropractors who operate total wellness clinics, and they often run these specialized blood tests that can “detect food sensitivities” and otherwise tell the client’s entire metabolic story, and then the chiropractor prescribes them a plan that will fix everything.
    #1 – that’s not how one-time blood tests work
    #2 – many of these lab values have disclaimers on them to indicate that they are proprietary and should not be used as diagnostic.

    For example, from the other camper’s lab report (emphases mine):
    Candida Antibodies IgG/IgM/IgA – “Results for this test are for research purposes only by the assay’s manufacturer. The performance characteristics of this product have not been established. Results should not be used as a diagnostic procedure without confirmation of the diagnosis by another medically established diagnostic product or procedure.” (<<<< this is also probably the "yeast" that this camper's chiropractor was talking about) IgG Wheat, IgG Casein - "This test was development and its performance characteristics determined by LabCorp. It has not been cleared or approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The FDA has determined that such clearance or approval is not necessary. The results should not be used as a diagnostic procedure without confirmation of the diagnosis by another medically established diagnostic product or procedure." My assumption is that this camper had the same sort of thing happen; he/she saw a chiropractor (DC) who "specializes in nutrition" that ordered blood tests similar to these, then told her that her blood yeast was elevated (see the Candida antibodies disclaimer above), and she has sensitivities to the foods tests based on IgG/IgM/IgA. Like I said above, IgG antibodies only mean that she has been EXPOSED to Candida (which makes sense because we all have it always), not that it's actually problematic. Same for the food sensitivities. 6) I had not heard of Dr. Axe before (what a cool name though), did some Googling. In addition to being a chiropractor, he is Naturopathic Doctor, but he also is a Certified Nutrition Specialist; this requires a graduate or doctoral degree (the ND would count but I don't think he'd be eligible if he were just a DC), supervised training, and passage of a certification exam, so he really does have certifiable nutrition training. Still, after looking into his website and other offerings, my concern is that he's using his nutrition training to advance a nutrition agenda that is proprietary for him (buy my book! I also sell supplements that will fix everything!) and sort of predatory toward people who buy into fad diets/nutrients du jour/etc. He also seems to promote the same thing for everyone, and its just not realistic to suggest that there is a one-size-fits-all nutrition solution. Very Doctor Oz-y. I'm also judging him a little by the company that he keeps (namely, Dr. Oz). Long story short, I'm happy that he at least has real nutrition training if he's going to be peddling nutrition advice, but I'm suspicious of his motives. Now, in the grand scheme of things, does it really matter if this camper has a diagnosable sensitivity to certain food or not? Not really. If she avoids certain foods and finds that she feel better, by all means, continue doing so. I just really strongly suggest following up with primary care or an allergist to do definitive diagnostic testing if she is concerned about allergies. Hope this helps! -S

  4. Abby puckett says:

    This is awesome! Thank you! I would love to show Sarah my blood test results so she could see what I had done…let me know an email and I can scan and send over!!!

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